Waitangi Treaty Grounds

The Waitangi Treaty Grounds provides a fascinating glimpse into New Zealand’s history. It was here on 6 February 1840 that the first 43 Maori chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown, whereby (the British Crown claimed) British sovereignty was established. The Treaty House was built in 1832 and was originally a home of British resident James Busby. It is now preserved as a museum. The iconic carved meeting house – Te Whare Rūnanga – is stunning. The fine carvings on the meeting house represent the main Maori tribes.

We can also highly recommend the cultural performances at the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, which take place during the summer. You can experience the thrill of a challenge from a Māori warrior as you make your way through the grounds. If you pass, you’ll continue on to Te Whare Rūnanga where you’ll encounter a traditional Māori welcome, and an energetic cultural performance by the resident performing arts group – Te Pitowhenua. After the show you can return to the café for a delicious hāngi dinner – cooked in a traditional Māori earth oven – in which your food is steamed to perfection.  Expert hāngi chefs will educate you on the cooking process as they tantalisingly reveal your feast.

You can get a glimpse into what awaits through this video clip filmed at the Waitangi Treaty Grounds: Waitangi Treaty Grounds